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Recommended Vaccines

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Recommended vaccines for infants (0 – 9 months)

DTaP

  • Diphtheria can make it hard to swallow and breathe. It is most dangerous for children under 5.
  • Tetanus (lockjaw) causes painful muscle stiffness, breathing problems and paralysis.
  • Pertussis (whooping cough) causes painful coughing spells you can’t stop, and is very dangerous for infants. More than half of babies under 1 with pertussis need to be hospitalized.

Hib

  • Hib disease in its most common form, meningitis, damages the covering of the brain and spinal cord. Particularly dangerous for children under five, Hib meningitis still kills one out of 20 infected children, even with medical care.

Polio

  • Polio can make children weak and cause paralysis.

Your child’s doctor may choose to give your child these vaccines in a combination shot, which would combine all 5 of these vaccines into 1 shot!  Ask your child’s doctor for more information.

Babies should get the DTaP and Hib vaccine at 2, 4 and 6 months.  They should get the Polio vaccine at 2 and 4 months, and again between 6 to 18 months.

HepB (Hepatitis B) Vaccine

  • Hepatitis B is a liver disease that can lead to severe illness, liver cancer and death. You may not know if your baby is exposed to hepatitis B because many people who are infected do not look or feel sick.

Babies should get this vaccine at birth, between 1 to 2 months and between 6 to 18 months.

Rotavirus Vaccine

  • Rotavirus causes severe diarrhea and vomiting which can lead to dehydration. It also causes fever and stomach pain, and is most dangerous for babies and young children.

Babies should get this vaccine at 2 months and 4 months. Depending on the type of vaccine your doctor’s office uses, your baby might need a third dose at 6 months. This vaccine is a liquid given by mouth.

Pneumococcal Vaccine

There are many types of pneumococcal disease. The most serious are pneumococcal pneumonia (lung infection), pneumococcal meningitis (infection of the covering of the brain and spinal cord), and sepsis (blood infection). The most common of these is pneumonia, which causes fever and chills, cough, difficult breathing, and chest pain. Children under 2 are most at risk from the disease.

Babies should get this vaccine at 2, 4 and 6 months.

All children 6 months and older should receive a yearly influenza (flu) vaccine. 

Recommended vaccines for babies and toddlers (12 – 24 months)

DTaP

  • Diphtheria can make it hard to swallow and breathe. It is most dangerous for children under 5.
  • Tetanus (lockjaw) causes painful muscle stiffness, breathing problems and paralysis.
  • Pertussis (whooping cough) causes painful coughing spells you can’t stop, and is very dangerous for infants. More than half of babies under 1 with pertussis need to be hospitalized.

Hib

  • Hib disease in its most common form, meningitis, damages the covering of the brain and spinal cord. Particularly dangerous for children under five, Hib meningitis still kills one out of 20 infected children, even with medical care.

Polio

  • Polio can make children weak and cause paralysis.

Your child’s doctor may choose to give your child these vaccines in a combination shot, which would combine all 5 of these vaccines into 1 shot!  Ask your child’s doctor for more information.

Babies should get the DTaP vaccine between 15 to 18 months.  They should get the Hib vaccine between 12 to 15 months.  If babies did not receive a third dose of Polio vaccine between 6 to 12 months, they will receive a dose between 15 to 18 months.

Pneumococcal Vaccine

There are many types of pneumococcal disease. The most serious are pneumococcal pneumonia

(lung infection), pneumococcal meningitis (infection of the covering of the brain and spinal cord), and sepsis (blood infection). The most common of these is pneumonia, which causes fever and chills, cough, difficult breathing, and chest pain. Children under 2 are most at risk from the disease.

Babies should get their fourth – and last - dose between 12 and 15 months.

The MMR vaccine combines 3 vaccines into 1 shot:

  • Measles causes high fever, a rash, and coughing.
  • Mumps causes fever, head and muscle aches, tiredness, and swollen glands.There is no cure for mumps. It can cause serious health problems, such as deafness and meningitis, an infection of the covering of the brain and spinal cord.
  • Rubella is usually a mild disease that includes a fever and rash, but quite dangerous for unborn babies. Most babies born to mothers who had rubella early in pregnancy will have a birth defect, including deafness, heart defects and intellectual disabilities.

Babies should get their first dose between 12 to 15 months.

Varicella (Chickenpox)

  • Chickenpox causes a rash of itchy blisters on the body and inside of the mouth. It spreads easily by coughing, sneezing and touching the rash. Chickenpox also causes fever, tiredness and headaches. Sometimes, it leads to bacterial infections of the skin, lung infection, dehydration and brain swelling. It can be deadly for babies.

Babies should get their first dose between 12 to 15 months.

HepB (Hepatitis B) Vaccine

  • Hepatitis B is a liver disease that can lead to severe illness, liver cancer and death. You may not know if your baby is exposed to hepatitis B because many people who are infected do not look or feel sick.

Babies should get their third dose between 6 to 18 months.

Hepatitis A

  • Hepatitis A causes serious harm to the liver. People may not look or feel sick, but can pass the disease to others. Most people who get sick with hepatitis A feel very sick for 2 months, but some are ill much longer.

Babies should get their first dose at 12 months and again between 18 and 24 months.

All children 6 months and older should receive a yearly influenza (flu) vaccine. 

Recommended vaccines for children (4 – 6 years)

DTaP

  • Diphtheria can make it hard to swallow and breathe. It is most dangerous for children under 5.
  • Tetanus (lockjaw) causes painful muscle stiffness, breathing problems and paralysis.
  • Pertussis (whooping cough) causes painful coughing spells you can’t stop, and is very dangerous for infants. More than half of babies under 1 with pertussis need to be hospitalized.

Polio

  • Polio can make children weak and cause paralysis.

Your child’s doctor may choose to give your child these vaccines in a combination shot, which would combine all 4 of these vaccines into 1 shot!  Ask your child’s doctor for more information.

Children should get 1 shot of DTaP and 1 shot of Polio between 4 to 6 years old.

The MMR vaccine combines 3 vaccines into 1 shot:

  • Measles causes high fever, a rash, and coughing.
  • Mumps causes fever, head and muscle aches, tiredness, and swollen glands.There is no cure for mumps. It can cause serious health problems, such as deafness and meningitis, an infection of the covering of the brain and spinal cord.
  • Rubella is usually a mild disease that includes a fever and rash, but quite dangerous for unborn babies. Most babies born to mothers who had rubella early in pregnancy will have a birth defect, including deafness, heart defects and intellectual disabilities.

Children should get their second – and final - dose between 4 to 6 years old.

Varicella (Chickenpox)

  • Chickenpox causes a rash of itchy blisters on the body and inside of the mouth. It spreads easily by coughing, sneezing and touching the rash. Chickenpox also causes fever, tiredness and headaches. Sometimes, it leads to bacterial infections of the skin, lung infection, dehydration and brain swelling.

Children should get their second – and final - dose between 4 to 6 years old.

All children 6 months and older should receive a yearly influenza (flu) vaccine. 

Recommended vaccines for preteens and teens (11 to 16 years)

The Tdap vaccine combines 3 vaccines into 1 shot:

  • Diphtheria can make it hard to swallow and breathe.
  • Tetanus (lockjaw) causes painful muscle stiffness, breathing problems and paralysis.
  • Pertussis (whooping cough) causes painful coughing spells you can’t stop.

Preteens should get 1 shot of Tdap between 11 to 12 years old.

Meningococcal (MCV4)

The MCV4 vaccine protects against some of the bacteria that causes meningococcal disease. There are many types of meningococcal disease. The two most common are:

  • Meningitis causes swelling of the lining around the brain and spinal cord. It is very serious and can lead to brain damage, hearing loss, learning problems, loss of limbs, and even death.
  • Sepsis causes your blood pressure to drop and can be very serious. It can also cause major organs and body systems to stop working the right way.

It is very important for teens to be vaccinated against meningococcal disease before moving into a college dorm, military barracks, or any environment in which they will be living closely with others.

Preteens should get one shot of Meningococcal vaccine between 11 to 12 years old. Teens should get a booster shot at age 16.

HPV

The HPV vaccine protects against several of the most common types of Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, like genital warts. It is now recommended for both girls and boys.

  • HPV is easily spread by skin-to-skin contact during sexual activity. HPV can cause cervical, vaginal, and vulvar cancer in women and penile cancer in men. It can also cause anal and some head and neck cancers in both men and women. Some types of HPV can cause genital warts.

Preteens should get 3 shots of HPV vaccine over 6 months between 11 to 12 years old.

All children 6 months and older should receive a yearly influenza (flu) vaccine.