Tag Archives: HPV

Preteens and Teens: Ensure their Healthy Future with Vaccines

Posted on August 14th, 2017

Adapted from the National Public Health Information Coalition – updated from August 2015

It’s National Immunization Awareness Month! It can be easy to forget that adolescents need vaccines too, especially when they’re busy with activities and they have fewer visits to see their healthcare providers than babies and young children. But it’s important to be sure they are protected because they are at greater risk for serious and potentially life-threatening diseases like meningitis, septicemia (blood infection), and the cancers caused by HPV infection.  Plus, the protection provided by some of the childhood vaccines (such as the vaccine to protect against whooping cough, tetanus, and diphtheria) begins to wear off, so preteens need a booster dose. Being vaccinated not only helps protect adolescents from getting these diseases; it also helps stop the spread of these diseases to others in their family, classroom and community. This is especially important to help protect babies too young to be fully vaccinated, people age 65 and older, and people with weakened immune systems due to cancer, heart disease or other health conditions. Continue reading

Preteens and Teens: Ensure their Healthy Future with Vaccines

Posted on August 6th, 2015

Adapted from the National Public Health Information Coalition

It’s National Immunization Awareness Month!  This week, August 2-8, the focus is on vaccines for preteens and teens.  It can be easy to forget that adolescents need vaccines too, especially when they’re busy with activities and they have fewer visits to see their healthcare providers than babies and young children. But it’s important to be sure they are protected because they are at greater risk for serious and potentially life-threatening diseases like meningitis, septicemia (blood infection), and the cancers caused by HPV infection.  Plus, the protection provided by some of the childhood vaccines (such as the vaccine to protect against whooping cough, tetanus, and diphtheria) begins to wear off, so preteens need a booster dose. Being vaccinated not only helps protect adolescents from getting these diseases; it also helps stop the spread of these diseases to others in their family, classroom and community. This is especially important to help protect babies too young to be fully vaccinated, people age 65 and older, and people with weakened immune systems due to cancer, heart disease or other health conditions.

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What Vaccines do Preteen and Teens Need?
There are four vaccines recommended for all preteens at ages 11 to 12. Teens may also need a booster dose of one of the shots or get any shots they may have missed. You can use any health care visit, including sports or camp physicals, checkups or some sick visits, to get the shots your kids need. The vaccines recommended for preteen and teen girls and boys are:

  • Quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine, which protects against four types of meningococcal disease. Meningococcal disease is caused by bacteria and is a leading cause of bacterial meningitis – a serious infection around the brain and spinal cord – in teens and young adults.
  • HPV vaccine, which protects against the types of HPV that most commonly cause cancer. HPV can cause future cancers of the cervix, vulva and vagina in women and cancers of the penis in men. In both women and men, HPV also causes mouth/throat (oropharyngeal) cancer, anal cancer and genital warts.
  • Tdap vaccine, which is a booster shot against tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis. Pertussis (whooping cough) can keep kids out of school and activities for weeks. It can also be spread to babies who are too young to be vaccinated, and this disease can be very dangerous and sometimes deadly for babies.
  • Influenza (flu) vaccine, because even healthy kids can get the flu, and it can be serious. All kids, including your preteens and teens, should get the flu vaccine every year. Parents should also get vaccinated to protect themselves and to help protect their children.

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Cervical Cancer and HPV: Prevention is Possible

Posted on February 2nd, 2015

by Chelsea Ginn, FNP-BC

Cervical cancer is caused by a virus known as the human papillomavirus (HPV). Not only is it one of the few types of cancer for which the cause is known, but it’s also one of only two types of cancer that can be prevented with a vaccine. That’s good news because HPV is extremely common. It’s estimated that 80 percent of people will get the virus at some point in their lives, though most will never know theyve been infected. When the infection doesn’t clear on its own, HPV can lead to genital warts or certain cancers. This includes cervicalvaginal, and vulvar cancers in women, penile cancer in men, as well as anal cancer, and mouth/throat (oropharyngeal) cancer in both men and women.

In the United States alone, 27,000 people are diagnosed with an HPV-related cancer every year.  That translates to a new case every 20 minutes!

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Important Immunization News You May Have Missed from 2014

Posted on January 1st, 2015

We’ve seen steady growth in readership on the Vax Maine Kids website, blog and Facebook page in 2014, and we are thankful for the support. As we continue our efforts to encourage parents to fully vaccinate their children throughout 2015, we’re hopeful that more people will turn to Vax Maine Kids for local, accurate, evidence-based vaccine information, news, and resources. After all, our goal is to help ensure Maine kids stay safe and healthy, which requires a commitment from parents, doctors, nurses, and public health professionals across the state.Brave little girl receiving injection

In looking back on this past year, we would like to highlight some of our most popular posts in hopes that they will provide a snapshot of the valuable information we share on this forum and on our website. We would like to encourage you to revisit these posts and share them with friends and family to help us engage even more people in these important immunization discussions. Continue reading